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REDUCING liver CANCER IN SAN FRANCISCO

SF CAN seeks to reduce new liver cancer cases and liver cancer deaths in San Francisco by 50 percent.

We will do this by reducing the impact of viral hepatitis.

Adult primary liver cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the liver.

Most liver cancers in the U.S. occur in people with cirrhosis (liver scarring), typically from chronic hepatitis B and C infection or heavy alcohol use. People with hepatitis B can also get liver cancer without having cirrhosis. 

Hepatitis B (HBV) is the primary cause of liver cancer. It can be transmitted by sexual contact, needle use, and during birth from mothers who are chronic carriers, a common way that Asian Americans get hepatitis B.

Hepatitis C (HCV) is another major cause of liver cancer. It is transmitted by sharing blood with an infected person via injection drug use, blood transfusions, or needle stick injuries.

Important facts:
 

  • Men develop liver cancer at more than double the rate of women.
     

  • Asian Americans bear the brunt of this disease, but the past 20 years have brought increases in liver cancer in African Americans and Latinos.
     

  • HCV and HBV can be asymptomatic, and many who are infected often are unaware that they harbor the viruses.

More more from the National Cancer Institute

 

 

about liver cancer

who should get screened

Get Screened!

Most liver cancers in the U.S. occur in people with cirrhosis (liver scarring), typically from chronic hepatitis B and C infection or heavy alcohol use. People with hepatitis B can also get liver cancer without having cirrhosis. San Francisco is no different.

Hepatitis and liver cancer resources in San Francisco

Shawne

Information is the key >

about hepatitis B and Hepatitis C

Questions about hepatitis B?

Call (415) 336-2629

New Phone Line Navigator from SF Hep B Free

 

reduce your risk: GET SCREENED

 

videos:  about screening

San Francisco Cancer Initiative 2020

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